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Greater focus on social justice has brought systemic inequities in the corporate sector to light, leading companies to step up their efforts in attracting and retaining a diverse workforce – but many challenges remain in implementing those goals. Following a joint report between the Kenan Institute and EY, this week’s Kenan Insight breaks down some challenges companies may face while trying to reach their diversity, equity and inclusion goals.

The Institute for Private Capital’s newly-released interactive model that aims to help private equity leaders assess diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) goals was featured in a report by Ernst & Young.

A recent report highlighting diversity, equity and inclusion in private equity and the launch of an accompanying interactive tool – developed by EY and IPC in collaboration with the Kenan Institute – were recently featured in Yahoo Finance. IPC Founder and Research Director Greg Brown said the model was made to help PE firms understand the link between DEI practices and recruitment and retention.

While the gender pay gap has received significant attention in recent years, little progress has been made to close it; in fact, in 2019, women still earned only 82 cents for every dollar received by their male counterparts for equal work. Policymakers in recent years have developed creative solutions aiming to close the gap, including bans prohibiting employers from asking for a job applicant’s salary history. However, in this week’s Kenan Insight, new research from our experts examines whether such well-intentioned bans are inadvertently lowering wages for all employees.

As of 2019, salary history bans have been enacted by 17 states and Puerto Rico with the stated purpose of reducing the gender pay gap. We argue that salary history bans may negatively affect wages as employers lose an informative signal of worker productivity. We empirically evaluate these laws using a large panel dataset of disaggregated wages covering all public sector employees in 36 states and find, on average, salary history bans lead to a 3% decrease in new hire wages. We find no decrease in the gender pay gap in the full sample and a modest 1.5% increase in the relative wages of women, as compared to men, among new hires most likely to have experienced gender discrimination historically.

Join UNC and OHUB for an evening of fun, connection and learning. If you have been reading about the full DEI Solutions (DEIS) Certificate Program and are curious about whether it’s right for you, this is an event you won’t want to miss! Hear from top leaders who are skilled at incorporating DEI solutions in their companies and learn about a helpful framework to support those efforts.

While the COVID-19 pandemic was devastating for many, research shows its impact was not felt equally. Black Americans experienced disproportionate health and economic ramifications, which compounded the financial, social and psychological strain many felt pre-pandemic, and have contributed to growing inter-generational wealth disparities. In today’s Kenan Insight, our experts explore whether the multi-trillion dollar “Build Back Better” plan proposed by the Biden administration holds the potential to begin closing pervasive gaps in American society.

Entrepreneurs from diverse backgrounds face a variety of challenges in accessing resources, expertise and funding. Hear experts from our 2021 Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Conference discuss persistent issues and promising solutions for creating vibrant entrepreneurial ecosystems.

UNC Kenan-Flagler Professor of Finance Paige Ouimet was recently interviewed by The Atlantic on the ramifications of a 2019 Colorado labor law requiring all companies to include salary details in job postings. The law, which was intended to ensure women and underrepresented minorities don’t lowball themselves when negotiating salaries, has been met with a surprising amount of resistance from business – with a number of top U.S. companies now hiring remote workers everywhere but Colorado.

Much has been written about the disproportionate number of women who have suffered pandemic-related job losses during COVID-19, but a related consequence has not been as well explored: the serious disruption of women’s careers, particularly in fields in which “path dependence” matters for success. In this Kenan Insight, we examine this more subtle asymmetry in the pandemic’s impact as indicative of far broader issues for women’s advancement in the workplace.

On Thursday, April 8, Hershey Company Chairman of the Board, President and CEO Michele Buck joined UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School Dean Doug Shackelford for an exclusive virtual discussion. Buck discussed the challenges and opportunities of leading one of America's most-loved brands along with the effects of the COVID19​ pandemic on the food industry and barriers to leadership facing women today.

Please join us for an exclusive conversation with Hershey's Chairman of the Board, President and CEO Michele Buck on Wednesday, April 8. This virtual experience is part of the Dean’s Speaker Series, hosted by UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School Dean Doug Shackelford.