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Market-Based Solutions to Vital Economic Issues

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Market-Based Solutions to Vital Economic Issues

Healthcare

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As featured in our 2021 Trends in Entrepreneurship Report, hear experts discuss leveraging analytics to drive improved healthcare access, treatments and delivery.

AI. CRISPR. mRNA. Key components of the rapidly expanding alphabet soup of technologies driving a boom in healthcare innovation. In this Kenan Insight, we explore why the 2021 Trends in Entrepreneurship Report names emerging technology in the healthcare industry as a key trend, along with some of the challenges that come with fast-moving technological advancements.

Question  Is a crowdsourcing open call a feasible approach to engaging the university community in COVID-19 safety strategies?

Findings  This qualitative study evaluated 82 submissions to a university open call for creative solutions from students, faculty, and staff to inform safety in the fall 2020 semester. Solutions were shared with university leadership, and several are being further developed.

Meaning  The results of this study suggest that open calls are a promising approach to understanding university community members’ concerns and identifying stakeholder-driven, innovative solutions for safe university activity during the pandemic.

Kenan Institute Senior Fellow Mary Moore Hamrick, CEO of Political Quotient Advisors, outlines the major “buckets” of President Biden’s proposed $3 trillion infrastructure bill.

Economic theory holds that competition drives innovation, improves the quality of goods and services, and lowers prices for consumers. Health care delivery is no exception.

How have AstraZeneca's recent missteps in reporting COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial results affected the public's trust, and what's next on the road to FDA approval? Hear from Emmes Chief Business Officer Lynn Lewis.

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has brought into focus the limits on flexibility and innovation associated with market consolidation in care delivery. While anecdotes about the ossification in care delivery predominate, broader economic indicators point to the negative outcomes of consolidation.

The factors that determine our health go far beyond what happens in the doctor’s office. In this Kenan Insight, we explore how the physical well-being of many Americans has been placed in jeopardy by upstream social and economic factors such as racism, food and job insecurity, and a lack of community and social support systems.

People of color are overrepresented relative to their shares of the total population in coronavirus infections, hospitalizations, and deaths. The same is true for people living in over-crowded multigenerational households. Because people of color are more likely to live in multigenerational households than are Whites, the pandemic is having a double whammy effect in communities of color throughout the U.S.

There are bipartisan Medicare payment proposals that would reduce Medicare payments included in previous Obama and Trump budgets that could go a long way to filling the budget shortfall. While previous policy proposals either proposed new revenue sources or payment reductions, recent policies are pragmatic in nature and attempt to modify either beneficiary or provider behavior.

Considerable scholarly analysis and media attention has documented the racially disparate impact of coronavirus infections, hospitalizations, and deaths. Constituting 13 percent of the general population, Blacks reportedly account for 25 percent of those that have tested positive and 39 percent of the COVID-related deaths in the United States.

The nursing profession in the United States was experiencing a labor shortage and facing diversity and inclusion challenges prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Magnifying these problems was a shift in the nation’s population, both geographically and demographically. The result was changes in both where nurses are needed in the healthcare system and the nursing skill set required to address healthcare needs of a far more diverse clientele of patients—in terms of race, ethnicity, sex, gender identity, age, living arrangements, socioeconomic status and primary language.

Our Healthcare Experts

Steve Sloate

Associate Faculty Director, Center for the Business of Health; Assistant Professor, Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health

Bradley Staats

Professor of Operations, Faculty Director of the Center for the Business of Health, UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School

Centers & Initiatives

Center for the Business of Health

Bringing together expertise from across UNC to create knowledge, prepare business leaders, and to convene important conversations around the business of healthcare.