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Kenan Institute 2024 Grand Challenge: Business Resilience
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Market-Based Solutions to Vital Economic Issues

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As healthcare costs continue to rise, many Americans are looking to artificial intelligence to provide cost-reducing solutions. At the 13th annual UNC Business of Healthcare Conference, a panel of experts separated the AI hype from reality in a discussion of the limitations, risks and ethical questions surrounding AI solutions in healthcare.

Taming the rising costs of prescription drugs has been a focus of U.S. healthcare reform for the past decade. High drug prices limit patient access while also contributing to higher overall healthcare costs. Recently, issues of how drug list prices are set, who reaps the benefits, and how those costs are passed on to patients have come under increased scrutiny.

Please join the Center for the Business of Health and the Kenan Institute for an exclusive lunchtime conversation with Dr. Craig Albanese and Dr. Wesley Burks, joined by Kody Kinsley. The Dean's Speaker Series talk is on Friday, Nov. 3 at 12:30 p.m.

Join the Center for the Business of Health for sessions including the rising price of drugs, the influence of consolidation on healthcare prices and costs, and the AI boom and reducing healthcare prices. Meals are included for in-person attendees.

The Kenan Institute recaps a panel on the business of women's health from the Center for Business of Health's November 2022 conference.

Physicians spend more than 5 hours a day working on Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems and more than an hour doing EHR tasks after the end of the workday. In this paper, we investigate how physicians' workflow decisions on when to perform EHR tasks affect: (1) total time on EHR and (2) time spent after work.

As major health systems continue to merge, one of the main questions for commentators and researchers concerns the somewhat vague idea of community benefit. The Atrium Health–Advocate merger is set to provide approximately $5 billion in annual community benefit, targeted to aid vulnerable communities and individuals. Community benefit can be understood as any action, investment or program provided by a tax-exempt hospital or health system that promotes the health and wellness of the community they serve. In addition to community benefit, Advocate Health described a $2 billion pledge to disrupt the root causes of health inequities across the rural and urban communities it serves.

It is probably not a mystery to even the most casual observer of political affairs why the historic climate, health care and tax bill signed earlier this month was dubbed the Inflation Reduction Act. Inflation is high and causing real problems for many households, and so if only Congress could legislate it away by enacting … This is not to say that the package does not deserve any enthusiasm; it is an impressive legislative feat, making significant, though imperfect, advances on health care and climate change. On the other hand, the effect it will have on inflation, its raison d’être in name, will be modest at best and occur only over time.

For more than a year, researchers across the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s (UNC) Kenan-Flagler Business School (KFBS) and School of Medicine (SOM) worked with Sharecare, Inc. (Sharecare) to establish a framework for measuring the true value of corporate well-being interventions and develop a measurement tool to quantify their impact over time. The goal of the research was to assess the value of implementing corporate well-being interventions to improve employee health and lower direct medical costs to employers.

Economic theory holds that competition drives innovation, improves the quality of goods and services, and lowers prices for consumers. Health care delivery is no exception.

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has brought into focus the limits on flexibility and innovation associated with market consolidation in care delivery. While anecdotes about the ossification in care delivery predominate, broader economic indicators point to the negative outcomes of consolidation.

There are bipartisan Medicare payment proposals that would reduce Medicare payments included in previous Obama and Trump budgets that could go a long way to filling the budget shortfall. While previous policy proposals either proposed new revenue sources or payment reductions, recent policies are pragmatic in nature and attempt to modify either beneficiary or provider behavior.